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Comparing Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite: Properties Differences and Identification

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite: A Comparison

Colored gemstones are popular in jewelry, and Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are two stones that have become increasingly popular in recent years. While they are two distinct stones, they do share some similarities.

In this article, we’ll compare Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite, look at their properties, and provide tips for identifying them.

Properties of Rainbow Moonstone

Rainbow Moonstone is a typically milky, to water clear gemstone that has an internal glow thats often described as looking like the moonlight shining on the water. Its classic moon-like appearance comes from the internal formations of calcium-enriched plagioclase feldspar.

Rainbow Moonstone belongs to the Orthoclase species, with the chemical formula KAlSi3O8.

Properties of Labradorite

Labradorite is a triclinic feldspar, which is frequently found in igneous rocks. It has an iridescent Schiller, that shows colorful flashes when the light hits it from different angles.

Its background is mostly opaque, gray, or brown and sometimes black. Labradorite is often used as a decorative stone, and is also used to create jewelry.

Labradorite belongs to the Anorthite species, with the chemical formula CaAl2Si2O8.

Similarities

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite belong to the same group of plagioclase feldspars, which means that they are essentially the same species. They also share similar internal formations, which gives them their unique appearance.

Finally, both stones have Schiller, which is a term that describes the reflective flash coming from crystal growth planes.

Differences

One notable difference between Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite is the presence of fire appearance. Rainbow Moonstone shows an internal pearly glow when it’s in the light.

The term “fire appearance” usually refers to the colors that are present on the stone’s surface. Rainbow Moonstone has a range of colors, from blue, yellow, green, and even pink.

In contrast, Labradorite usually has a limited color palette, with colors that change depending on the angle. Another difference is the stone clarity.

While Rainbow Moonstone is usually clear, Labradorite is opaque and has an iridescent Schiller on its surface.

Identifying Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite

Spotting the difference between Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite can be challenging, especially when dealing with low-grade stones. Here are some things to look out for when identifying Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite:

Appearance of low-grade stones

Low-grade Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite usually have a milky or opaque appearance with black specks. This is a sign that the stone is of low quality.

Appearance of high-grade stones

High-grade Rainbow Moonstone is water clear with an iridescent Schiller and a range of colors depending on the angle. The schiller is usually placed across the stone, giving it a distinct look.

High-grade Labradorite, on the other hand, has an opaque background with a visible iridescent Schiller running through its surface.

Deceptive selling

Unfortunately, some sellers deceive customers into buying subpar stones by selling low-end Labradorite as Rainbow Moonstone. Be wary of off-white cuts that look junky.

In conclusion, Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are unique stones that have become increasingly popular in jewelry. Despite looking similar, they have different properties and are used for different purposes.

To identify the two, observe the appearance, quality, and fire appearance of the stone. With this knowledge, you can confidently add Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite to your collection, knowing that you have an eye for quality and authenticity.

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite: Background Information

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are two popular stones that belong to the feldspar family. These beautiful stones are often used in jewelry and are collected by many gemstone enthusiasts.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the background information on Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite, including their mineral family, formation, and availability and use.

Mineral Family

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite belong to the feldspar family, which is one of the most common groups of minerals on Earth. Feldspar minerals make up about 60% of the Earth’s crust and are found in many types of rocks.

The plagioclase and orthoclase are the two primary subcategories of feldspar. Rainbow Moonstone belongs to the orthoclase subcategory, while Labradorite belongs to the plagioclase category.

Formation

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are formed through slow crystal growth, that takes place over a long time indicating how scarce it could be. They form in different ways depending on the type of feldspar.

In the case of Rainbow Moonstone, it forms in different layers with different crystal planes. The internal formations give Rainbow Moonstone its unique appearance.

The structural feature that gives Rainbow Moonstone its pearly internal glow is called the ‘adularescence.’ The schiller in Labradorite forms as a result of a single mineral rich in calcium and sodium and has different crystal planes.

Availability and Use

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are moderately available compared to other stones such as diamonds or sapphires. However, they are cheaper and more accessible, making them desirable for people seeking beautiful gemstones at an affordable price.

Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are both popular stones that are used in jewelry such as necklaces, bracelets, and earrings. Rainbow Moonstone also gets used in many spiritual works because of its metaphysical capabilities, which include helping to channel energy, connecting with higher forces, calming the mind, and uplifting emotions.

Labradorite is also used by people seeking a deeper spiritual connection to oneself and linking one’s consciousness to insights in higher realms than oneself.

Labradorite has also been used as a decorative stone in many architectural designs throughout history.

Historical buildings in Europe, for example, contained ornamentations, decoration, and decorative sculptures made from Labradorescence, bringing its stunning Schiller animations to be appreciated by many. Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite can also be collected and displayed as part of a gemstone or mineral collection.

In recent years, the popularity of gemstone and mineral collections has increased, and Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite have become more sought after among collectors. In conclusion, Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are two stunning stones that belong to the feldspar family.

They are formed through slow crystal growth, and their unique internal formations give them their beautiful appearance. While they are moderately available compared to other stones, they are cheaper and offer an affordable option for those looking for beautiful gems.

They are both popular stones used in jewelry and are also collected by gemstone enthusiasts. Whether you are looking for a spiritual connection or a stunning piece of jewelry, Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are versatile stones that can provide both beauty and inner peace.

In conclusion, Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are two unique and beautiful stones that have become increasingly popular in jewelry and as collectibles. We have discussed their properties, similarities and differences, and provided tips for identification.

Additionally, we have explored their mineral family, formation, use, and availability. Whether you are an enthusiast or just starting, Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite are great options to add to your collection or use in your jewelry.

Below are some frequently asked questions that may help answer any remaining concerns:

Frequently Asked Questions:

1. Are Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite the same stone?

No, they are two different stones that belong to the same feldspar family. 2.

What gives Rainbow Moonstone its pearly glow?

It’s a structural feature called adularescence, which is produced due to multilayered crystal plane formations.

3. How can I tell if I have a low-grade or high-grade Rainbow Moonstone?

High-grade Rainbow Moonstone is water clear with a visible Schiller placing while low-grade has a milky or opaque appearance with black specks. 4.

Is Labradorite a hard stone?

Yes, Labradorite is quite durable, registering 6 to 6.5 on the Mohs hardness scale.

5. Can Rainbow Moonstone be used in spiritual practices?

Yes, Rainbow Moonstone is often used in spiritual works as it is believed to assist in channeling energy and emotional balance.

By understanding these FAQs along with the article’s main points, you should have a better idea of Rainbow Moonstone and Labradorite and their uses in jewelry or collections.

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