Rock Discoveries

Beyond the Hype: How to Spot Real Labradorite from Fakes

Recognizing Real Labradorite vs.

Fake Labradorites

Labradorite is an enchanting stone that has won the hearts of many people due to its striking appearance and unique optical effect.

The play-of-color effect, known as labradorescence, captures the attention of anyone who gazes upon this stone. However, not all stones labeled as labradorite are genuine, and it takes a keen eye to differentiate between real labradorite and fake labradorites.

In this article, we will explore the characteristics of real labradorite and the tricks used to make fake labradorites.

Recognizing Real Labradorite

Real labradorite is a gemstone that belongs to the feldspar group and is mainly found in Canada, Finland, and Madagascar. It is a grayish-blue stone with a semi-transparent appearance and a hardness of 6-6.5 on the Mohs scale.

One of the distinguishing characteristics of labradorite is the play-of-color effect caused by light interference with the microscopic layers present in the stone.

The spectral colors produced are unique and include metallic blues, greens, yellows, oranges, pinks, and violets.

This optical effect is more pronounced when the stone is viewed in direct light or sunlight. Therefore, if you notice a stone with vibrant and iridescent spectral colors, it could be real labradorite.

Another characteristic of real labradorite is its heavy weight and hardness. Notably, labradorite is a dense stone that feels cold to the touch.

Additionally, careful examination of the surface of the stone will reveal small cleavage planes running parallel to the surface.

Fake Labradorites

The rising demand for labradorite has led to the availability of numerous fake labradorites in the market. These fake stones are produced using a combination of clay, plastic, or resin that is dyed and molded to look like real labradorite.

Here are some of the characteristics of fake labradorites.

Baked Clay Labradorite

Baked clay labradorite is made by molding clay to form slabs or cabochons that look like real labradorite. The clay is then left to dry and baked to harden it.

The finished product is painted, and a glossy coating is applied to make it look like the real thing.

One way to identify baked clay labradorites is by their weight.

Clay is lightweight and does not have the dense feel of real labradorite. Additionally, baked clay labradorites lack the unique optical effect produced by the microscopic layers present in the real gemstone.

UV Resin Labradorite

UV resin labradorite is created by pouring UV-curable resin into a mold that mimics the shape of a labradorite slab or cabochon. This resin is then dyed to create the spectral colors present in real labradorite.

Once the dye has been added, the resin is exposed to UV light to harden it.

UV resin labradorites have a glossy appearance, are lightweight, and lack the distinctive cold feel of real labradorite.

Moreover, they lack the cleavage planes that are typical of real labradorite.

Polymer Labradorite

Polymer labradorite is created using a similar method to UV resin, but the polymer clay is baked instead of being cured using UV light. The finished product is coated to give it a glossy finish and make it look like real labradorite.

Polymer labradorites are lightweight, lack the cold feel of real labradorite, and have a surface that bounces back when poked with a finger. They also struggle to produce the play-of-color-effect unique to real labradorite.

Thinner Slab Labradorite

Fake labradorites are typically thinner than real labradorite slabs. This is because most fake labradorites are made from thin layers of plastic or resin that are molded to mimic the appearance of real labradorite.

Additionally, they lack the cleavage planes that are typical of real labradorite.

The Bottom Line

Real labradorite is a beautiful and unique gemstone that has a distinctive appearance and optical effect. Its hardness, weight, and cleavage planes make it easy to distinguish from fake labradorites.

Baked clay, UV resin, polymer, and thinner slab labradorites are all examples of fake labradorite that can be identified using the characteristics described in this article. Always purchase from a reputable dealer and ask for a certificate of authenticity when in doubt.

With this information, you can enjoy the splendor of real labradorite without being fooled by fake imitations. Spectrolite: A Fiery Variety of Labradorite

Labradorite is a mesmerizing stone that has taken the world by storm with its unique characteristics and optical effect.

There are different variations of labradorite, and one of the most popular is spectrolite. Spectrolite is a unique kind of labradorite that is known for its fiery colors and brightness.

In this article, we will explore the defining features of spectrolite and how to differentiate it from other types of labradorite.

Defining Spectrolite

Spectrolite is a variety of labradorite found in Ylmaa, Finland. It is so unique that it has been named Finland’s national stone.

One of the defining features of spectrolite is its striking fiery colors that range from yellow to blue and green. This coloration is due to the interplay of light on unique inclusions of plagioclase feldspar.

Aside from its vivid spectral colors, spectrolite has excellent brightness that makes it stand out from other types of labradorite. It’s a truly magnificent stone that looks like a piece of the night sky.

Identifying Real Labradorite

With the increasing demand for labradorite, it has become more challenging to differentiate between real labradorite and fake ones. Here are some methods that you can use to spot a real labradorite stone.

Observing The Appearance

Real labradorite has an inhomogeneous appearance, which means that the stone appears differently when viewed from different angles. This feature is due to the microscopic layered structure found in the stone.

You can test the inhomogeneous effect by rotating the stone back and forth and observing how it appears. Another aspect of appearance to observe is the cut of the stone.

Real labradorites are often cut en cabochon, which is a style of cutting that involves forming a convex, polished surface. This cut style highlights the stone’s unique optical effect and spectral colors.

Hardness Test

The Mohs scale is used to measure the hardness of a mineral. Real labradorite has a rated hardness of 6 to 6.5 on the Mohs scale, which means it is relatively hard.

You can test the hardness by scratching the surface of the stone with a tool that has a hardness of 7 or higher, such as quartz or topaz. If the stone gets scratched easily, it’s likely that it’s not real labradorite.

Another hardness test that can be done is a needle test, where a needle is used to scratch the surface of the stone. Real labradorite is resistant to scratches from needles.

UV Light Test

Real labradorite is inert to UV light, meaning it does not respond or glow under UV light. This is a useful test to determine the authenticity of labradorite stones that have been dyed or treated with UV-reactive materials.

Spectrolite vs. Other Types of Labradorite

Spectrolite is a type of labradorite, but not all labradorite is spectrolite.

Distinguishing between spectrolite and other types of labradorite can be challenging, but here are some characteristics that set it apart:

Colors: Spectrolite is known for its fiery colors that shift and change depending on the angle and light. Other types of labradorite have more muted or single-toned colors.

Brightness: Spectrolite has exceptional brightness that makes it stand out. Other types of labradorite may be less bright.

Transparency: Spectrolite is typically more transparent than other types of labradorite, which can help emphasize its spectral colors. Price: Spectrolite is known for being rare and expensive compared to other types of labradorite.

The Bottom Line

Spectrolite is a unique variety of labradorite that is characterized by its vivid, fiery colors and excellent brightness. When shopping for labradorite, it’s essential to know the characteristics and tests that can be used to identify a real gemstone.

Observing the appearance, doing a hardness test, and a UV light test are practical methods that can be used to differentiate between real and fake labradorite. With these methods, you can ensure that you’re investing in a genuine labradorite stone that will give you a lifetime of enchanting beauty.

Spotting Fake Labradorite: Characteristics and Tests

As the demand for labradorite continues to grow, it’s becoming more challenging to differentiate real labradorite from fake labradorites. Unfortunately, fake labradorites are widespread in the market, and if you’re not careful, you might end up buying a fake gemstone.

In this article, we will explore some characteristics and tests that can help you spot fake labradorites.

Characteristics of Fake Labradorite

One of the identifying characteristics of fake labradorite is even color. Fake labradorite is usually dyed or painted to mimic the multi-colored effect of real labradorite.

However, the dye is often applied uniformly, leading to a consistent color throughout the stone. Another characteristic of fake labradorite is the absence of labradorescence.

This optical effect is unique to labradorite and is caused by the interplay of light on the microscopic layers present in the stone. Fake labradorites lack labradorescence, and even when viewed in direct sunlight, they do not produce the same spectral colors that are typical of real labradorite.

In addition, fake labradorites often have black, opaque backs. This is because they are often produced using black clay or other cheap materials, covered with a thin veneer of dyed or painted resin that mimics the top surface of the real gemstone.

Production Process of Fake Labradorite

Clay baked in an oven is one of the most common materials used to produce fake labradorites. The clay is molded into a slab or cabochon and dyed or painted to resemble the appearance of real labradorite.

The slab or cabochon is then baked in a low-temperature oven to harden the clay, and a layer of shiny resin is applied to give it a polished finish. Another method used to produce fake labradorite is to pour dyed or painted UV-curable resin into a mold that mimics the shape of the gemstone.

The resin is then cured using UV light to harden it.

Tests to Identify Fake Labradorite

One of the most reliable tests used to identify fake labradorite is the hardness test. Real labradorites have a rate hardness of 6 to 6.5 on the Mohs scale, which means they’re relatively hard.

You can perform the hardness test by scratching the surface of the stone with a tool that has a hardness of 7 or more, such as quartz or topaz. If the stone gets scratched easily, it’s likely a fake labradorite.

Another useful test for identifying fake labradorite is the UV light test. Real labradorites are inert to UV light, which means they do not fluoresce under UV light.

This is a useful test to determine if the stone has been treated with UV-reactive dyes or resins. The scratch test is another useful method for identifying fake labradorite.

You can use a sharp knife or blade to scratch the surface of the gemstone. Real labradorites are resistant to scratches and do not get easily damaged by sharp objects.

However, fake labradorites are often made from weaker materials that scratch very quickly. Labradorite From China: Real or Fake?

Labradorite from China is processed in China, but the stones can be real or fake. Although there are some fake labradorites that are manufactured in China, there are also many genuine labradorites that come from China.

One of the characteristics that differentiate Chinese labradorites from fake labradorites is their appearance. Real Chinese labradorites have unique inclusions that make the stone look like a piece of art.

The colors and optical effects of the stone are natural and not artificially produced. In addition, Chinese labradorites have high-quality cutting and polishing, which helps to bring out the unique optical effects of the stones.

They are also relatively hard and resistant to scratches, which is another characteristic of real labradorite.

The Bottom Line

Fake labradorites are common in the market, and if you’re not careful, you can end up spending a lot of money on a fake gemstone. Even though fake labradorites can be challenging to detect, there are characteristics and tests that can help you differentiate them from real labradorites.

While labradorite from China can be both real and fake, it’s essential to buy stones from trustworthy dealers and pay attention to the appearance and quality of the stone. With this knowledge, you can confidently invest in genuine labradorite and enjoy its unique and enchanting beauty for years to come.

Conclusion: The Enchanting Beauty of Labradorite and How to Spot Fakes

Labradorite is a fascinating gemstone that has captured the hearts of many with its unique optical effect and spectral colors. Its occurrence is a miracle of nature that results from the interplay of light with microscopic layers of the stone.

Labradorite is prized for its beauty and can be found in many parts of the world, including Canada, Finland, and Madagascar. Unfortunately, with the growing demand for labradorite, the market is flooded with fake labradorites that can be difficult to distinguish from the real gemstone.

To ensure that you’re investing in a genuine labradorite stone, you need to be aware of the characteristics of real labradorite and know how to spot fake ones. One of the defining characteristics of real labradorite is its unique and distinct spectral colors that shift and change depending on the angle and light.

Another characteristic is its lack of cleavage fractures, which means that it does not break easily under pressure. Real labradorites are often warm to the touch and have a specific weight and thickness.

Moreover, real labradorites should be inert to UV light, so if a supposed labradorite catches a significant glow under a UV light source, then it is likely fake. Thin slabs of dyed or painted UV resin are often produced to mimic the appearance of real labradorite.

To differentiate between real and fake labradorites, it is useful to observe the inhomogeneous effect that real labradorites produce when viewed from different angles. Additionally, you can perform hardness tests, scratch tests, and UV light tests to confirm the authenticity of the stone.

In conclusion, labradorite is a beautiful and abundant mineral that deserves to be treated with respect. It has unique optical and physical properties that make it stand out from other gemstones.

The essence of labradorite lies in its powerful protective properties that are enhanced by the optical effect and its rare occurrence. Therefore, it is vital to know how to spot fake labradorites and invest in genuine stones.

By observing the distinguishing characteristics of real labradorite and knowing how to test for its authenticity, you can confidently enjoy its enchanting beauty and harness the power of its protective energy. In conclusion, labradorite is a remarkable gemstone that has captured the hearts of many with its unique optical effect and spectral colors.

Despite the growing number of fake labradorites in the market, it is possible to distinguish real labradorites from fakes. Knowing the characteristics and tests that can be used to differentiate between real and fake labradorites is essential when making a purchase.

The abundance of information provided in this article will help readers understand how to spot genuine labradorites and invest in them. Remember, labradorite is a wonder of nature that is deserving of admiration, and its protective properties are matched by its aesthetic appeal.

FAQs:

Q: What is labradorite? A: Labradorite is a gemstone that is recognized for its optical effect known as labradorescence, which produces a unique spectral color display.

Q:

Popular Posts